ABC News - Terry Tang

With over 14 million people expected to check into airports nationwide for Labor Day weekend, a number of them inevitably will be travelers with dementia or some sort of cognitive impairment

Over 14 million people are expected to check into airports nationwide for Labor Day weekend and, inevitably, some will be travelers with dementia or another cognitive impairment. Nearly a dozen airports — from Phoenix to Kansas City, Missouri — in the last few years have modified their facilities and operations to be more dementia-friendly, advocates say. They've added amenities like quiet rooms and a simulation center where travelers with dementia can learn about flying or get a refresher.

Looking for a gate, trying to remember flight times or following terse commands from Transportation Security Administration agents while in line with others can overwhelm someone with dementia. Symptoms like forgetting words can be mistaken for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

But most large U.S. airports are behind the curve on serving travelers with dementia when compared with some airports in Australia and Europe.

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