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Construction of a single consolidated passenger terminal is the “preliminary preferred” alternative of planners studying options for the next 20 years for St Louis Lambert International Airport (STL), MO. The proposal, outlined in a briefing to city airport commissioners by consulting firm WSP USA, calls for a new linear concourse with 62 gates that would replace the 54 scattered across the two current terminals. The new concourse would connect to the ticketing-area portion of the current Terminal 1 (T1) topped by its four iconic domes. That area, which has been a Lambert hallmark since 1956, would remain and expand to the west with new construction. T2, which opened in 1998, would either be demolished or perhaps used for some other purpose such as a hotel, said Airport Director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge. The plan also calls for a new larger garage to be built in place of the existing garage and a nearby lot outside T1. Hamm-Niebruegge emphasized that no decision has been made to go forward with the idea. She said many detailed discussions are still needed with Lambert’s airlines, city government leaders and others and additional public input also will be sought. A cost estimate has yet to be devised for the preliminary plan, but Hamm-Niebruegge commented that you can’t build a new terminal at less than a billion dollars. She said the selling of bonds repaid by airline fees, existing passenger facility charges tacked on to airline tickets and federal funds are among the ways such a project could be funded. Switching to a single terminal also was recommended in a 2012 Lambert master plan and in 2019 by a group of consultants hired by a city panel that explored leasing Lambert to private companies and using some of the revenue to upgrade the airport. The current WSP proposal calls for a single terminal of 1.57 million ft²; the airport’s two current terminals total 1.3 million ft². WSP’s recently released study says Lambert’s current T1 has surplus space but is “functionally obsolete.” #1161.24